By Chuck Parks, Editor

June 5, 2018

On Monday District Court Judge Todd Taylor ruled that because the plaintiffs in the Martin Marietta Asphalt Plant case did not file a stay to stop the construction of the embattled asphalt plant, that it does not have to be torn down. Taylor sent the case back to the Weld County Commissioners to review the Use By Special Review Permit to see if Martin Marietta can correct all of the reasons the plant was denied by the Colorado Supreme Court.

On Monday District Court Judge Todd Taylor ruled that the embattled Martin Maietta Asphalt  Plant does not have to be torn down because the plaintiffs did not file a stay to stop the construction while the case made its way through the Colorado Courts.

Judge Taylor sent the case back to the Weld County Commissioners, one of whom is embroiled in a recall effort and another that has 1 ethics violation complaint pending at the Colorado Independent Ethics Commission, and another who recently had a Martin Marietta hired lobbyist to work his table at the Weld County Republican Assembly, to give Martin Marietta a chance to correct all of the issues that caused the plant to be denied in Colorado Supreme Court. In April Martin Marietta Materials Regional Vice President David Hagerman predicted the plant would be operational but never elaborated on how they were going to accomplish that.

In a statement, Monday Hagerman said the company looks forward to going through the next steps of the county’s use by special review process. Officials said the plant is ready to operate.

If the plant is operational the town of Johnstown and Milliken will be looking at hundreds of trucks per day rolling through their communities to gain access to I25 and Highway 85 in addition to the increased train traffic to feed the plant production materials. Weld County Commissioners ordered the repaving of Highway 60 through both towns last year to accommodate the increased truck traffic.